Peer navigation for Indigenous women in HIV and hepatitis C care

Event Date: 
October 27 2021, 1:00 pm EDT

In partnership with the pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group.

Register now!

Peer navigation is a promising approach for supportive HIV and hepatitis C care. There is an emerging need for Indigenous-centred models of peer navigation. This is especially important given that Indigenous people, women in particular, are over-represented among those who have lived and living experiences of HIV and/or hepatitis C, as well as being under-represented among those accessing care.

This webinar will provide an opportunity to learn about the findings from two community assessments in British Columbia and Saskatchewan, conducted by pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group as part of the Peers4Wellness (P4W) study.

During the webinar, facilitators will share experiences from their work in B.C. and Saskatchewan, including: Indigenous approaches to conducting community assessments; findings regarding the needs and visions for Indigenous-centred peer navigation; and what is different or unique to Indigenous-specific, Indigenous-led approaches/initiatives and why they are important aspects of healthcare for Indigenous women.

The panel discussion will create a space to exchange knowledge with other community organizations, community support workers, peer navigators and healthcare providers in Canada to co-learn about common and context-specific needs and opportunities for Indigenous peer navigation programs.

Moderator: Sarah MacDonald, Communications Officer, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, University of Saskatchewan

Speakers:

  • Sharon Brass, Elder, Community Research Associate, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, University of Saskatchewan
  • Dr. Alexandra King, Cameco Chair in Indigenous Health and Wellness, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, University of Saskatchewan
  • Candice Norris, Peer Research Associate, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, University of Saskatchewan
  • Sadeem Fayed, Research Associate, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, Simon Fraser University
  • Luke Heidebrecht, Research Associate, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, University of Saskatchewan
  • Nathan Oakes, Research Associate, PhD candidate, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, University of Saskatchewan
  • Kehinde Ametepee, Project Officer, pewaseskwan Indigenous Wellness Research Group, University of Saskatchewan
  • Corrina Russ, Peer Support Worker, PACE