Prevention in Focus

Fall 2017 

Fast Facts: Hepatitis C treatment cascade and developments in access to treatment

Hepatitis C treatment cascade in British Columbia in 2012 (the only published hepatitis C treatment cascade in Canada)1

73,203: The estimated number of people who were anti-hepatitis C positive in B.C.

75%: The estimated percentage of anti-hepatitis C positive people in B.C. who have been diagnosed antibody positive.

56%: The estimated percentage of anti-hepatitis C positive people in B.C. who have had an HCV RNA test.

36%: The estimated percentage of anti-hepatitis C positive people in B.C. whose hepatitis C has been genotyped.

12%: The estimated percentage of anti-hepatitis C positive people in B.C. who have initiated treatment.

7%: The estimated percentage of anti-hepatitis C positive people in B.C. who have been cured.

What do we know about the diagnoses of hepatitis C nationally?2

10,890: The number of reported diagnoses of hepatitis C diagnoses in Canada in 2015.

30.4: The reported number of diagnoses of hepatitis C per 100,000 Canadians in 2015.

38.1: The rate of hepatitis C diagnoses in men per 100,000 in 2015.

22.4: The rate of hepatitis C diagnoses in women per 100,000 in 2015.

What do we know about the prevalence of hepatitis C nationally?3

332,414: The estimated number of Canadians who were antibody positive for hepatitis C in 2011.

42.6%: The estimated percentage of antibody-positive cases in 2011 that were among people who inject drugs.

35.0%: The estimated percentage of antibody positive cases in 2011 that were among people born in a country outside of Canada.

220,697 to 245,987: The estimated number of Canadians living with chronic hepatitis C in 2011.

56%: The estimated percentage of people living with hepatitis C who are aware they have it in 2011.

Developments in HCV treatment access4

February 2017: The pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance (pCPA), the body that represents provinces and territories in negotiations with pharmaceutical companies, reached a deal with several companies for lower prices for six hepatitis C medications. 

10: The number of provinces and territories that have adopted these drugs onto their formularies and are lowering their eligibility restrictions: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Nunavut, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Yukon.

British Columbia: The first province to announce that in 2018–2019, hepatitis C treatment will be available to everyone with a chronic hepatitis C diagnosis regardless of type or severity.

References