Prevention in Focus

Fall 2015 

Essential resources

An update on the management of chronic hepatitis C: 2015 Consensus guidelines from the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver

This update to the 2012 Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver consensus guidelines on the management of hepatitis C reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis C in Canada, preferred diagnostic testing approaches and recommendations for the treatment of chronically infected patients with new direct-acting antiviral agents. Recommendations are also made about approaches to reduce the burden of hepatitis C in Canada.

Recommendations on Treatment of Hepatitis C 2015

These recommendations from the European Association for the Study of the Liver are intended to assist physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as patients and other interested individuals, in the clinical decision-making process by describing the current optimal management of patients with acute and chronic HCV infections. These recommendations apply to therapies that have been approved in the European Union at the time of their publication.

HIV/AIDS Epi Updates - Chapter 8: HIV/AIDS among Aboriginal People in Canada

This chapter of the HIV/AIDS Epi Updates series summarizes recent epidemiological information and findings from Canadian research on HIV in Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis). It begins with a demographic overview of the Aboriginal population using information from the 2011 National Household Survey and followed by surveillance data and estimates on HIV prevalence and incidence among Aboriginal people. The final section describes the factors, including determinants of health that affect the vulnerability of Aboriginal people to HIV and the experience of diagnosis, care, treatment and support for Aboriginal people living with HIV.

This document from the Public Health Agency of Canada provides public health professionals, researchers, policy makers, and community organizations with current information on HIV and AIDS among Aboriginal people to help them develop and implement culturally relevant policy, research, prevention, education and support services that address the needs of Aboriginal people.

Report on Sexually Transmitted Infections in Canada: 2012

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to be a significant public health concern in Canada. Rates of reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and infectious syphilis have been rising since the late 1990s. This report from the Public Health Agency of Canada describes the trends and patterns in these three nationally reportable STIs in Canada, focusing on the past decade (2003 to 2012).

Questions and answers: Prevention of sexually transmitted and blood borne infections among older adults

The goal of this resource from the Public Health Agency of Canada is to help community organizations, health professionals, educators and others to develop and implement evidence-informed sexually transmitted and blood borne infections (STBBI) prevention interventions and programs that address the needs of older adults. The document discusses the social, structural, and economic determinants of vulnerability to STBBIs, key considerations for STBBI prevention and promising practices for STBBI prevention that meet the needs of diverse older adults.

Syphilis among gay, bisexual, two-spirit and other men who have sex with men: A resource for population-specific prevention

Sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections continue to be a significant public health concern in Canada. Across Canada, infectious syphilis rates are on the rise with the majority of infections occurring among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM). This resource from the Public Health Agency of Canada synthesizes evidence, assesses the effectiveness of behavioural interventions and provides promising practices and evidence-informed strategies for the prevention of syphilis among gay men and other MSM. It is intended to support public health professionals and community organizations in the development of evidence-informed strategies for the prevention of syphilis among this population.

Effectiveness of interventions for syphilis prevention and control in MSM: A summary of published research findings

This document, developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases, provides a brief summary of grey literature and published research literature findings from studies that address the effectiveness of interventions for syphilis epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM). This body of research generally addresses five main approaches, interventions that: promote safe sex, increase testing, improve partner notification, modify risks in the social environment, or improve access to treatment.

Chlamydia among young women: A resource for population-specific prevention

Chlamydia continues to be the most commonly reported sexually transmitted and blood borne infection in Canada. This resource from the Public Health Agency of Canada synthesizes evidence, assesses the effectiveness of behavioural interventions and provides promising practices and evidence-informed strategies for the prevention of chlamydia among young women aged 30 and under. It is intended to support public health professionals and community organizations in the development of evidence-informed strategies for the prevention of chlamydia among this population.

Tuberculosis in Canada 2013: Pre-release

This report from the Public Health Agency of Canada provides a brief, initial overview of the preliminary number of reported active (new and re-treatment) TB cases and corresponding incidence rates in Canada for the most recent reporting year (2013). The data presented in this report were extracted from the Canadian Tuberculosis Reporting System (CTBRS), a case-based surveillance system that maintains selected non-nominal data on people diagnosed with active TB disease, on September 30, 2014. The data presented in this abbreviated report are provisional and subject to change prior to the release of Tuberculosis in Canada, a more comprehensive report that is published every three years.