Prevention in Focus

Fall 2013 

Fast facts: STIs in Canada – cause for concern

Chlamydia

143% – The percentage increase in the number of reported cases of chlamydia from 1997 to 2010.

94,690 – The number of reported cases of chlamydia in 2010.

278 – The number of reported cases of chlamydia for every 100,000 people in Canada in 2010.

2:1 – The ratio of reported cases of chlamydia in women in 2010 compared to men.

63% – The percentage of reported cases of chlamydia among Canadians aged 24 and under in 2010.

Gonorrhea

124% – The percentage increase in the number of reported cases of gonorrhea from 1997 to 2010.

11,397 – The number of reported cases of gonorrhea in 2010.

33 – The number of reported cases of gonorrhea for every 100,000 people in Canada in 2010.

56% – The percentage of reported cases of gonorrhea among men in 2010.

52% – The percentage of reported cases of gonorrhea among Canadians aged 24 and under in 2010.

Syphilis

1200% – the percentage increase in the rate of reported cases from 1997 to 2010.

1,757 – The number of reported cases of infectious syphilis in 2010.

5.2 – The number of reported cases of infection syphilis for every 100,000 people in Canada in 2010.

90% – The percentage of reported cases of infectious syphilis among men in 2010.

73% – The percentage of reported cases of infectious syphilis among Canadians aged 30 and older in 2010.

What do we know about STIs?

Sex – Oral, vaginal and anal sex are risk factors for infection with chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis.

Condoms – The consistent and correct use of condoms can reduce the risk of acquiring or transmitting chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis.

Testing – Encourage testing in sexually active people because chlamydia and gonorrhea can be asymptomatic. Chlamydia and gonorrhea can be screened through a urine test or a urethral, throat, cervical or anal swab; syphilis can be screened through a blood test.
The incidence of chlamydia, gonorrhea and infectious syphilis among gay men and other men who have sex with men in Canada has been increasing since the mid-1990s. The presence of HIV may make it harder to diagnose and treat syphilis.

Treatment – Chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis can be cured.

Increased risk for HIV infection – HIV-negative individuals with an STI may have an increased risk for HIV infection.

Increased risk for HIV transmission – HIV-positive individuals with an STI may have an increased risk for HIV transmission to another person.

Reference

Public Health Agency of Canada. Report on Sexually Transmitted Infections in Canada: 2010. Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control, Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch, Public Health Agency of Canada; 2012. Available at: http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/aspc-phac/HP37-10-2010-eng.pdf